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Steve53

Dad's 1954 Omega

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Steve53

Here is my late dad's Omega from 1954. At 33mm it is small by today's standard but I suppose that was normal in the 1950ies.

Omega-and-Seagull-013.jpg

I sent the watch to the Swatch Group in Switzerland for restoration. 550 Euro, thank you :D. Oh well. The watch has tremendous sentimental value to me. Dad and I had our differences while he lived for sure but this is the only tangible item I have after him. It is a treasure for me and I will keep it for life. The price of restoration becomes irrelevant..

Swatch replaced the crystal, crown, mainspring, hands, screws, two gears and they removed the old radio-active (?) lume. The case looked awful after four decades of use so it was cleaned up a bit. New mainspring increased the power reserve from 36 to 52 hours.

The old crystal was so scratched it was hard to read the time. I told dad: "Go see a watch-smith. Put a new glass in it". He said: "No way, that will cost a lot of money". Today I can understand where he was coming from, having lived through the 30ies depression and survived the war. I do know this much: he would be shocked knowing how much I paid to have the watch professionally restored.

The dial is original but the hour markers and  3-9-12 numbers were nicely polished. Dad was such a cheap skate, I do not think he ever had the watch serviced in 44 years of ownership. Just occasionally a new strap, when the old one was worn out.

Omega-and-Seagull-014.jpg

The crown looks better than this photo shows. It is a reflection from the "holding fixture" for taking the picture.

Omega-and-Seagull-017.jpg

Swatch did a nice job cleaning up the movement. I do not have a "before" photo, but it did not look nice like this.

Omega-and-Seagull-018.jpg

Small, but in my eyes, a beauty.

Omega-and-Seagull-019.jpg

The local authorized Omega dealer wanted $250 for a genuine strap. I thought: "no way, go suck on a sock". Maybe I have inherited some of dads frugal ways :D. So the strap is a generic one but my watch-smith had a genuine Omega buckle. I was chuffed.

Omega-and-Seagull-022.jpg

Pretty good numbers for a 65 year old watch. The beat error is a bit high but the movement does not have a beat error regulator. I suppose the error could be reduced by playing with the balance wheel weights? My watch-smith suggested just leave it as is. Probably good advice.

The watch is a keeper.

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Chavezzito

44 years without service...good quality :thumbsup:

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Thommo82

Beautiful!

My Dad is a cheapskate too and wears a Seiko from 1982, which just so happens to be the year I was born.

Hopefully it gets passed down to me one day.

Thanks for the write up, treasure that watch forever and pass it on to your children

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Rokerite
Posted (edited)

Can see where the modern Planet Ocean drew inspiration from with this watch. Amazing it was still getting 36 hours of power after 64 years with no service. Enjoy :clap:

Edited by Rokerite

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RussP

Nice write-up.

Thanks for sharing this story with the forum.

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GulfGT40

The moneys irrelevant but worth every cent you spent on it. Great life momento... enjoy

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semperfi55

Thanks for sharing this. Always love a vintage watch, especially one that is handed down! 

Hah restoring sentimental watches tend to cost more than the actual watch, been there a couple times myself :facepalm:

 

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Mystery Shopper

I wanted to buy my daughter a watch for her 18th but she said she wouldn't wear it. Her phone is better and is more accurate apparently.

My wife & I have celebrated milestones with watches. Some were bought to remember places and some for anniversaries. The most special were either given to eachother or were given by someone special. Recently, my Grandpa (who bought me my first watch) would have been 100 & I wore one of his watches to lunch with my brother. I have more work to do with my daughter.

Your Omega is a beautiful watch and a nice way to reflect on your Dad.

 

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NCRich

Thanks for posting this.  Lovely.

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Not Quite Dead

This is lovely, recently lost my Mum, at age 90 and she went on her own terms, and this made me think that whatever it costs I will get my Dad's ancient Timex on a rally strap back in working order. As a watch it had very few aspects that appeal but as a memento it means the world.

Nice watch and a good post.

 

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simplemind

Very nice!

thanks for sharing. goes to show, buy something quality it holds up. That watch was probably very expensive in 1954 around about $100us  I suspect. which was alot of money. Dad told me he paid that for his first car.

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PostMaster

Thanks for sharing it was a good read, the watch is quality & definitely a keeper. 

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repmaster1234

Absolutely gorgeous watch, and good on you for taking care of it and giving it the TLC it deserves. Thanks for sharing :) 

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lrnz
Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, finch69 said:

Here is my late dad's Omega from 1954. At 33mm it is small by today's standard but I suppose that was normal in the 1950ies.

Omega-and-Seagull-013.jpg

I sent the watch to the Swatch Group in Switzerland for restoration. 550 Euro, thank you :D. Oh well. The watch has tremendous sentimental value to me. Dad and I had our differences while he lived for sure but this is the only tangible item I have after him. It is a treasure for me and I will keep it for life. The price of restoration becomes irrelevant..

Swatch replaced the crystal, crown, mainspring, hands, screws, two gears and they removed the old radio-active (?) lume. The case looked awful after four decades of use so it was cleaned up a bit. New mainspring increased the power reserve from 36 to 52 hours.

The old crystal was so scratched it was hard to read the time. I told dad: "Go see a watch-smith. Put a new glass in it". He said: "No way, that will cost a lot of money". Today I can understand where he was coming from, having lived through the 30ies depression and survived the war. I do know this much: he would be shocked knowing how much I paid to have the watch professionally restored.

The dial is original but the hour markers and  3-9-12 numbers were nicely polished. Dad was such a cheap skate, I do not think he ever had the watch serviced in 44 years of ownership. Just occasionally a new strap, when the old one was worn out.

Omega-and-Seagull-014.jpg

The crown looks better than this photo shows. It is a reflection from the "holding fixture" for taking the picture.

Omega-and-Seagull-017.jpg

Swatch did a nice job cleaning up the movement. I do not have a "before" photo, but it did not look nice like this.

Omega-and-Seagull-018.jpg

Small, but in my eyes, a beauty.

Omega-and-Seagull-019.jpg

The local authorized Omega dealer wanted $250 for a genuine strap. I thought: "no way, go suck on a sock". Maybe I have inherited some of dads frugal ways :D. So the strap is a generic one but my watch-smith had a genuine Omega buckle. I was chuffed.

Omega-and-Seagull-022.jpg

Pretty good numbers for a 65 year old watch. The beat error is a bit high but the movement does not have a beat error regulator. I suppose the error could be reduced by playing with the balance wheel weights? My watch-smith suggested just leave it as is. Probably good advice.

The watch is a keeper.

very nice watch, but imho  0.7 is a bit high.

Old movements such as this one, despite not having the """ quick set """" beat adjustment, it's still possible to adjust the beat rate,  by separating the balance from the balance bridge, and rotating the hairspring.

 

you do that by inserting the screwdriver in the circled slot, and turning it ( as if it was a screw ) in the direction and in the amount you need in order that when everything is installed in the movement, the balance jewel stays right in the middle of the fork's bankings ( if they're called like that ).

45671850045_fee1ce7e27_o.jpg

 

anyway if the watch doesn't gain or loose crazy amounts of seconds, keep it as it is, but if it does, send it back, this shouldt happen when someone pays over 500 for a service of a manual wind watch

have a look at minute 3:30

 

Edited by lrnz

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Glaude

That's a very nice job  they did and a very nice watch too ! 

I like the fact that they didn't mess with the dial other than the markers, not what like Rolex would have done !

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Mystery Shopper
Quote

Recently, my Grandpa (who bought me my first watch) would have been 100 & I wore one of his watches to lunch with my brother

This was another of Grandpa's watches which my mum still wears.

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fatarms

You know what's funny?  33mm is small by today's standards.  And in 40 years, the trends will probably be back to smaller 33-35mm watches, and our kids will be inheriting our watches and posting them on watch boards saying "look at the size of this fucking thing.  Who the hell wears a 43mm watch??  This thing is a monster and heavy as hell"  :lol:

The important thing is the link to the watch, who cares how big or small it is.  It's where it came from.  Great story and congrats on the restoration.  Some things you just can't put a price on.

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BIG GRUNDY

Thanks for sharing...that watch is stunning. (Love the patina,)  Gramps would be proud!

 

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