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Del

Del’s Photography Setup, Settings and System.

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callsign21a

Thanks Del....made a light tent a few days ago not quite up to your standard but results are improving I do admire some of your backgrounds.....that one of the only sunnyday in Scotland was good !!!

 

Gheers

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Del

BTW,do you use JPG or RAW format

JPG. I keep meaning to try some shots in RAW but just haven't done so yet.

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scorpion

BTW,do you use JPG or RAW format

JPG. I keep meaning to try some shots in RAW but just haven't done so yet.

 

Does taking some shots in RAW involve removal of clothes?

1 laught.gif

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diplosa

 

This was effin awesome!

 

 

76CD3D60-5EF9-42B6-B419-CEC8CC5BB9DA-1403-0000009F7836C890_zps0723d683.jpg

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Nisv

Thanks for sharing Del, saved for posterity :thumbsup2:

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jeffw69

Great, how do I apply this to my iPhone?

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dmpmassive

This is a really great job of a tut Del! Awesome work!

 

Couple tricks from my book I'll share. I hope that's OK.

 

Put the whole watch and scene on a lazy-Susan rotating tray. This gives you another variable you can adjust to help with pesky reflections. Just rotating the watch a couple of degrees is sometimes all it takes. I've also used a circular polarizer filter with varying degrees of success to deal with reflections, but IMO it's better to just get you angles right in the first place.

 

I always hate throwing away pixels during the crop. You might want to look into getting a set of extension tubes. They're relatively inexpensive and will let you focus in a lot closer on the subject saving you from tossing resolution away when you crop in on the scene. If your lens can push in really close that's great! Others reading this might find that their lenses do not. A set of extension tubes are a great addition to you camera bag, and are far cheaper than an purpose built AF Macro Lens.

 

Finally, don't bother with a RAW workflow unless you're using some software that's streamlined for it, like Lightroom, Aperture or DxO Optics Pro. If you have such an application, do it! Otherwise it's a hassle and the gains aren't necessarily work it.

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Del

Hey del, you should get one of these, they are really cheap and great for when you take a lot of pics.

 

http://www.ebay.co.u...=item1c2f5a9ca9

I actually have one but don't use it - I don't see the need tbh. ;)

 

Great, how do I apply this to my iPhone?

:rofl:

 

Couple tricks from my book I'll share. I hope that's OK.

Very helpful mate - some great tips! :thumbsup2:

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jeffw69

:P

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Corv99

Great stuff Del...

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Wriggles

Class tutorial Del. Very impressed. Got myself one of those tripods in Lidl as well a while ago and for the money they are the dogs.

Once get enough of a collection together I'll try to get my shit together and attempt some of this, and I'll post my guaranteed miserable attempts for mockery!!

 

Fair play and thanks for spending the time for give us a peek into your methods

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digger2

Great tutorial Del! Personally I have almost given up the long shutter times and take my pics freehand using a Compact cam with built in processor that takes several pics in macro mode and processes them to get a good shot, then I just use photoshop elements to remove outside dust if needed.

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

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Baldrick
Put the whole watch and scene on a lazy-Susan rotating tray. This gives you another variable you can adjust to help with pesky reflections. Just rotating the watch a couple of degrees is sometimes all it takes. I've also used a circular polarizer filter with varying degrees of success to deal with reflections, but IMO it's better to just get you angles right in the first place.

 

It's not really ideal to move the subject, the whole notion of photography is "painting with light".....it's much better to keep both the camera and the subject static and instead move the light to adjust for reflections.........just set it up for the best exposure on the dial without worrying about 'blowing out' the bracelet or strap....then adjust the lighting for the bracelet.....use PS to mask dial from bracelet and layer / composite the 2x images together to give the best shot...ergo...no blowouts on steel bracelets and no reflections on dials.....and no nightmares involved.....!

 

Sent from The Magic Circle by telepathy !

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Odyseus

Hi Del,

Would you recommend the Olympus Evolt E420?? They seem quite cheap second hand these days?

Can you get reasonable macro shot's with the supplied lens? - As i would like to take decent close up's of watch mechanisms, while writing watch movement services??

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Del

It's not really ideal to move the subject, the whole notion of photography is "painting with light".....it's much better to keep both the camera and the subject static and instead move the light to adjust for reflections.........just set it up for the best exposure on the dial without worrying about 'blowing out' the bracelet or strap....then adjust the lighting for the bracelet.....use PS to mask dial from bracelet and layer / composite the 2x images together to give the best shot...ergo...no blowouts on steel bracelets and no reflections on dials.....and no nightmares involved.....!

Holy moly, that's a great idea! Every day's a school day! :D:thumbsup2:

 

Would you recommend the Olympus Evolt E420?? They seem quite cheap second hand these days?

Can you get reasonable macro shot's with the supplied lens? - As i would like to take decent close up's of watch mechanisms, while writing watch movement services??

I'm not qualified to recommend any camera mate. I like the one I have, it does everything I need it to do, and apparently quite well. ;)

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Odyseus

I certainly can't fault your photographs's!! - they're bloody brilliant!!

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ron76

This is a thread worth reading, thanks Del.

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Loonie

Sweet setup secrets :)

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jeffw69

My camera, which I need to learn how to use:

 

4BC9B874-A0F7-45B7-ABF5-6143B6D7529E-5879-000002FC65FC8934_zpse7db0527.jpg

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ron76
My camera, which I need to learn how to use:

 

4BC9B874-A0F7-45B7-ABF5-6143B6D7529E-5879-000002FC65FC8934_zpse7db0527.jpg

How did you shoot that pic ? :)

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jeffw69
My camera, which I need to learn how to use:

 

How did you shoot that pic ? :)

 

 

Magic! :rofl:

 

 

no, I used my iphone.

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ron76
My camera, which I need to learn how to use:

 

How did you shoot that pic ? :)

 

 

Magic! :rofl:

 

 

no, I used my iphone.

A true magician :lol:

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Ncj

Thanks Del, great info....

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dmpmassive
Put the whole watch and scene on a lazy-Susan rotating tray. This gives you another variable you can adjust to help with pesky reflections. Just rotating the watch a couple of degrees is sometimes all it takes. I've also used a circular polarizer filter with varying degrees of success to deal with reflections, but IMO it's better to just get you angles right in the first place.

 

It's not really ideal to move the subject, the whole notion of photography is "painting with light".....it's much better to keep both the camera and the subject static and instead move the light to adjust for reflections.........just set it up for the best exposure on the dial without worrying about 'blowing out' the bracelet or strap....then adjust the lighting for the bracelet.....use PS to mask dial from bracelet and layer / composite the 2x images together to give the best shot...ergo...no blowouts on steel bracelets and no reflections on dials.....and no nightmares involved.....!

 

Sent from The Magic Circle by telepathy !

 

Very true, moving your lighting is always best. The turntable idea was more in the context of a light-tent setup when you can't just drag your soft boxes to exactly the right spot.

 

I'm going to try your compositing tip tonight! Thanks Baldrick!

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